Here’s a peak into some of the best mountains to see in the Italian & Swiss Alps

  • Bunnik Tours
  • 24 Aug 21

When it comes to Europe, the first things you often think of are food, culture, and enchanting architecture. However, we think the spectacular and accessible mountain regions that adorn the Italian and Swiss Alps should take some of that cake! Here’s a peak at some of the very best mountains you can experience in the Italian and Swiss Alps.

Tre Cime di Lavaredo mountains in the Dolomite ranges, Italy by Den-Belitsky

Tre Cime di Lavaredo mountains in the Dolomite ranges, Italy by Den-Belitsky

Piz Nair

At 3,057 metres above sea level, Piz Nair of the Abula Alps, Switzerland, is a mountain that towers above the many other beautiful and dazzling peaks that surround it. Geographically based in the canton of Graubünden and overlooking the luxurious resort town of St Moritz, we challenge you not to swoon over the dreamy views that await you atop the heavenly Piz Nair summit.

The mountain summit is easily accessible with a funicular and cable car but, for those who wish to go toe-to-toe against the mountain’s elevation, you can do so via the many available walking paths.

Pro tip: The sunrise in the Abula Alps is exceptionally stunning and for the best vantage point, take the early morning cable car up to the peak of Piz Nair and witness the amazing spectacle at over 3,000 metres above sea level.

View from the top of Piz Nair by Jonathon Williams
View from atop of Piz Nair by Jonathon Williams

Lake Sankt Moritz, St Moritz in the Swiss Alps by Eva Bocek
Lake Sankt Moritz, St Moritz by Eva Bocek

Matterhorn

The mountain to conquer all mountains, the Matterhorn straddles the ridge between Switzerland and Italy. Standing at a whopping 4,478 metres about sea level, it is large…VERY large! As such, it’s a magnet for those seeking a climb that’ll effortlessly inject a stimulus of grandeur once you’ve made it to the top.

Overlooking the Swiss town of Zermatt and the Aosta Valley in Italy, this behemoth of a mountain is unmistakable in its appearance. With its perfectly formed pyramidal shape, the Matterhorn would have even the best of ancient Egyptian architects nod their heads in approval.

Pro tip: Ride a cable car up the slopes of this imposing mountain to Glacier Paradise, the highest cable car station in Europe, for breathtaking views over the Italian, French and Swiss Alps.

The mighty Matterhorn during sunrise by Biletskiy Evgeniy
The mighty Matterhorn during sunrise by Biletskiy Evgeniy

Summer morning in Zermatt village with the Matterhorn in the background by Andrew Mayovskyy
Summer morning in Zermatt village with the Matterhorn in the background by Andrew Mayovskyy

Jungfrau

The emblematic Jungfrau (meaning ‘Top of Europe’) lives in the Bernese Alpine Range in western Switzerland. The mountain rises to a staggering 4,158 metres and is home to Switzerland’s ultimate perch, the Jungfraujoch, which is the highest railway station in Europe. The panorama and the feel of altitudinous air that waits at the top is nothing short of breathtaking and there is also a series of activities for you to enjoy.

At the Jungfraujoch, you can:

  • Visit the Sphinx Observatory, one of the highest observatories in the world
  • Admire the many ‘cool’ ice sculptures at Jungfraujoch Ice Palace, an attraction that was painstakingly chiselled by hand, 30 metres below the longest glacier in Europe, Aletsch
  • Take a stroll down the Alpine Sensation moving walkway
  • Dine at the many restaurants in the Sphinx
  • Visit Lindt’s Swiss Chocolate Heaven for delectable sweets

Pro tip: With the icy air and incredibly high altitude – even in the summer – it can get chilly. So, remember to dress warmly and apply sunscreen as the sun is likely to be quite fierce at high elevations.

The Sphinx Observatory, Jungfrau by Nick
The Sphinx Observatory, Jungfrau by Nick

Beautiful ice sculptures at Jungfraujoch Ice Palace under Jungfrau peak by Chisanu Liengpan
Beautiful ice sculptures at the Jungfraujoch Ice Palace under Jungfrau peak by Chisanu Liengpan

Dolomites

Enchanting as much as it is a diverse playground for the avid outdoor adventurer, the iconic Dolomite ranges in northeast Italy are often one of the first things that spring to mind when thinking about the Italian Alps. Sometimes aptly referred to as the ‘Pale Mountains’ due to their pale complexion that similarly resembles the colour of the carbonate rock of the same name, the monumental expanse is actually comprised mostly of limestone.

Do not be transfixed on the glorious mountain peaks and immensely green valleys for too long as there is also a plethora of things to see and do, including its fascinating cultural heritage to discover that spans both Austrian and Italian roots.

Pro tip: Make your way up the mountains to the open-air Museum of the Cinque Torri, which bears the scars of WWI battles fought between the Italians and Austro-Hungarians.

Beautiful landscape of the Italian dolomites from Santa Maddalena, Italy by Piotr KrzeslakBeautiful landscape of the Italian dolomites from Santa Maddalena, Italy by Piotr Krzeslak

Landscape of autumn Cinque torri mountains with trenches of World War by viktoriya89Landscape of autumn Cinque Torri mountains with trenches of World War by viktoriya89

If this little taste into the Italian and Swiss Alp region has ‘peaked’ your curiosity, check out our Alpine Discovery small group tour now for a complete alpine adventure.

;