Capital
Capital — Podgorica
Population
Population — 628,000
Language
Language — Montenegrin
Religion
Religion — Predominantly Christian
Time Zone
Time Zone — 9 hours behind AEST
Currency
Currency — Euro
  • Montenegro has five national parks that cover approximately 10% of the country’s territory!
  • About 60% of Montenegro is over 1,000 metres high.
  • It’s coastline along the Adriatic Sea is approximately 295 kilometres, with over 72 kilometres of usable beaches. The big beach of Velika Plaza is 13 kilometres long and up to 60 metres wide.
  • Montenegro’s biggest export products are wine, tobacco, olives and smoked ham.
  • The country got its name (literally ‘Black Mountain’) from the dark, mountain forests that cover its territory.
  • Bobotov Kuk peak in northern Montenegro is the country’s highest peak, standing tall at 2,523 metres.
  • Montenegro shares borders with Croatia in the west, Bosnia & Herzegovina to the northwest, Serbia to the northeast and Albania to the southeast.
  • Montenegro is known as a special habitat for many mammals, including wild pigs, bears, deer, martens, wolves, foxes and wildcats!

Australian passport holders travelling to Montenegro do not need a visa at this time.

We require that your passport is valid for travel for at least six months from the date you are planning to return to Australia. Your passport must be valid to travel internationally and must be machine-readable. You also need to carry a valid return ticket on you.

Whether travelling on an Australian passport or the passport of another country, all travellers require visas for a number of countries, and it is your responsibility to secure what may be required before departing Australia. You can consult with your travel agent, but it is also recommended that you check the foreign embassy website for your respective destination as it can also provide you with useful information.

Australian Embassy in Montenegro:

At present, there is no Australian Embassy in Montenegro. The Australian Embassy in Serbia handles matters for Montenegro.

8th Floor
Vladimira Popovica 38-40
11070 New Belgrade
Serbia

Ph. +381 11 330 3400
Fax. +381 11 330 3409

The official currency of Montenegro is the Euro. Notes come in denominations of €500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5.

The recommended currency to take to Montenegro is the Euro. Ensure you change a small amount into small denominations.

Advise your bank of your travel plans so that they can make a note of it, otherwise they may cancel your credit card as a safety measure due to the overseas transactions. Also make a note of the 24-hour emergency contact number of the bank or building society which issued your credit card in the unlikely event that your card is lost or stolen.

Whenever possible use ATMs when the banks are open (Mon – Fri) so that if a machine ‘eats’ your card you can then deal with it straight away. It is always advisable to carry a supply of cash in addition to your credit card.

If you don’t have Euro’s with you on arrival, we advise you to exchange some money into the local currency at the airport even if the exchange rate is not the best, this way you’ll have money to get a drink, snack or give a tip during those first few hours of arrival. Your guide will be able to advise you on the best places to exchange money.

Small change is also useful for paying for toilets while on tour which is customary in many places outside of Australia.

  • The price of a cappuccino in Kotor is approximately €2 - €2.50.
  • The price of an inexpensive lunch is approximately €10.
  • The price dinner in a moderate restaurant is approximately €20.
  • The price of a beer in a local pub is approximately €4.50 - €5.

Due to its small size and close proximity to so many other countries, Montenegro’s cuisine has been heavily influenced by Greek, Italian and even Turkish cuisine. Fresh seafood from the Adriatic also features proudly in many dishes. Fish goulash, Buzara, is often served with spinach or boiled potatoes. Kajmak, a cheesy cream, is paired with beef, pork and poultry. Also well worth a try is the famous prosciutto from Njegusi. Olives are widely grown here and also feature in many dishes. Drinks include the famous Vranac wine and fruit flavoured brandy, rakija.

Important: When dining at buffets (i.e. breakfast) please refrain from taking food away with you to ‘save’ for later! If you feel that you’ll need snacks between meals, pack some dried fruit, nuts, muesli bars etc.

If you have specific food allergies and/or preferences, we highly recommend you take every precaution before your tour, including carrying a small card with your food allergy listed in each language of every country you are travelling to show to table staff when ordering. Whilst we take all dietary requirements seriously, due to the serious nature of potential allergic reactions, it is your responsibility to be as prepared as possible.

Similar to other countries in the Balkan region, coastal Montenegro enjoys a sunny Mediterranean climate. Summers are long, warm and dry and winters are generally fairly mild and wet.  In the mountains, Montenegro tends more towards an alpine climate, where it is cooler but dry for most of the year.

Want to get out and explore on your own?

The best way to navigate yourself around most Montenegrin cities and towns is on foot! Walking offers visitors a wonderful chance to explore the picturesque town squares and cobblestone streets. Only the capital, Podgorica, has a local bus system, however, taxis are available in most towns.  

When catching taxis, have small change on you and choose one with a meter, if it doesn’t have one then negotiate the price before getting in. Also, ask your guide or hotel staff the names of reputable taxi companies.

Want to get out and explore on your own?

The best way to navigate yourself around most Montenegrin cities and towns is on foot! Walking offers visitors a wonderful chance to explore the picturesque town squares and cobblestone streets. Only the capital, Podgorica, has a local bus system, however, taxis are available in most towns.  

When catching taxis, have small change on you and choose one with a meter, if it doesn’t have one then negotiate the price before getting in. Also, ask your guide or hotel staff the names of reputable taxi companies.

Want to get out and explore on your own?

The best way to navigate yourself around most Montenegrin cities and towns is on foot! Walking offers visitors a wonderful chance to explore the picturesque town squares and cobblestone streets. Only the capital, Podgorica, has a local bus system, however, taxis are available in most towns.  

When catching taxis, have small change on you and choose one with a meter, if it doesn’t have one then negotiate the price before getting in. Also, ask your guide or hotel staff the names of reputable taxi companies.

A small country, Montenegro has some fun events and festivals happening throughout the year, including the Mimosa Festival in February and March, celebrating the appearance of spring with the first mimosa blossoms.

Other national public holidays to be aware of include:

  • New Year’s Day
  • Orthodox Christmas Day (January 7th)
  • Easter Friday and Easter Monday
  • Labour Day (May 1st)
  • Victory Day (May 9th)
  • Independence Day (May 21st)
  • Statehood Day (July 13th)
  • Christmas Day
  • Boxing Day

Small Group Tours

Jewels of Dalmatia

Discover the splendour of the Adriatic coastline and its surrounding treasures.

Airfares included

Days 21
From (Per person / Twin share) $9,995

Croatia & Slovenia

An enchanting small group tour across the south of central Europe calls. Discover the jewels of the Adriatic countries of Croatia and Slovenia.

Days 10
From (Per person / Twin share) $4,395

Bunnik Reviews